Saturday Mass, Practice, and Work Day

Since Fr. Sandquist will be at our chapel with four seminarians for a work day, we will have mass on Saturday, Feb. 1st, at 8 am.

Afterward we will eat breakfast, take down Christmas decorations, and have choir and server practice.

Then the work projects will begin, which will include installing double doors on the chapel entrance from the hallway so that we may have the Blessed Sacrament reserved on our altar and finishing sheetrock projects in the confessional, priest’s office, and cry room.3F76E077-A7CE-4901-BA53-EAC189EF729867863074-BD75-430D-BFAD-546D279A141C

Mass Time Change for Jan. 19th & Other News

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A SUNDAY MORNING LOW MASS

Fr. Sandquist will offer Mass for us at 10 am this Sunday to accommodate his travel schedule to the CMRI priests’ meeting. Father will hear confessions beginning at 9:30. We will return to the regular schedule the following Sunday: Confessions at 1, Mass at 1:30.

A SUNDAY AFTERNOON HIGH MASS

Four CMRI seminarians will be visiting our chapel on Feb. 1-2. On Saturday they will assist us with chapel work projects, and on Sunday they will sing, so we will be able to have a High Mass for the Feast of the Presentation/Candlemas.

The World in Danger Saved by the Holy Name

Chapter 3 from The Wonders of the Holy Name by Fr. Paul O’Sullivan, O.P. (E.D.M.)

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In the year 1274 great evils threatened the world.  The Church was assailed by fierce enemies from within and without.  So great was the danger that the Pope, Gregory X, who then reigned, called a council of Bishops in Lyons to determine on the best means of saving society from the ruin that menaced it.  Among the many means proposed, the Pope and Bishops chose what they considered the easiest and most efficacious of all, viz., the frequent repetition of the Holy Name of Jesus.

The Holy Father then begged the Bishops to call on the Name of Jesus and to urge their peoples to place all their confidence in this all-powerful Name, repeating it constantly with boundless trust.  The Pope entrusted the Dominicans especially with the glorious task of preaching the wonders of the Holy Name in every country, a work they accomplished with unbounded zeal.

Their Franciscan brothers ably seconded them.  St. Bernardine of Siena and St. Leonard of Port-Maurice were ardent apostles of the Name of Jesus.

Their efforts were crowned with success so that the enemies of the Church were overthrown, the dangers that threatened society disappeared and peace once more reigned supreme.

This is a most important lesson for us because, in these our own days, dreadful sufferings are crushing many countries, and still greater evils threaten all the others.

No government or governments seem strong and wise enough to stem this awful torrent of evils.  There is but one remedy, and that is prayer.

Every Christian must turn to God and ask Him to have mercy on us.  The easiest of all prayers, as we have seen, is the Name of Jesus.

Everyone without exception can invoke this holy name hundreds of times a day, not only for his own intentions, but also to ask God to deliver the world from impending ruin.

It is amazing what one person who prays can do to save his country and save society.  We read in Holy Scripture how Moses saved by his prayer the people of Israel from destruction, and how one pious woman, Judith of Betulia, saved her city and her people when the rulers were in despair and about to surrender themselves to their enemies.

Again, we know that the two cities of Sodom and Gomorrha, which God destroyed by fire for their sins and crimes, would have been pardoned had there been only ten good men to pray for them!

Over and over again we read of kings, emperors, statesmen and famous military commanders who placed all their trust in prayer, thus working wonders.  If the prayers of one man can do much, what will not the prayers of many do?

The Name of Jesus is the shortest, the easiest and the most powerful of prayers.  Everyone can say it, even in the midst of this daily work.  God cannot refuse to hear it.

Let us then invoke the Name of Jesus, asking Him to save us from the calamities that threaten us.

 

Honoring a Bishop

This is an excerpt from American Catholic Etiquette by Kay Toy Fenner, first published by The Newman Press, Westminster, Maryland, in 1961.

A bishop is a priest who has received the fullness of holy orders, that is, the power to administer confirmation and holy orders as well as all the other sacraments. Most bishops also have other administrative duties above those of a priest. Because of this, special distinction is shown a bishop by all other members of the Church.

A Catholic formally greets a bishop by kissing the ring which is one of his marks of office. When one is greeting a bishop within the diocese of which he is the head, one kneels to kiss his ring.  Properly one should kneel upon the left knee (kneeling on the right knee as a mark of respect is reserved for the Blessed Sacrament); but many people find kneeling on the left knee awkward. If one kneels on the right knee, one need not be concerned; it is a minor lapse of no importance.

It is never wrong, either from a religious or social point of view, to greet a bishop by kissing his ring. It is done at weddings, funerals, ordinations, any entertaining at which the bishop is the host, or meetings of Catholic organizations.

The gesture is sometimes omitted at mixed gatherings, such as the dedication of a public building lest it be misunderstood by non-Catholics present; but it is proper to kiss the episcopal ring under these circumstances if one wishes.

If one has frequent dealing with a bishop because of the nature of one’s work–when one meets him perhaps several times in a day–the usual practice is to kiss the ring at the first daily meeting and to omit the gesture for the remainder of the day.

No layman, religious, or cleric below the rank of bishop sits in the presence of a bishop until he requests one to do so. If seated, one rises when a bishop approaches to address one and remains standing until he invites one to be seated.

At a social gathering, the hostess or chairman says to the bishop, before any others present, “Please be seated, Your Excellency” and indicates a seat on her (his) right. If the bishop arrives after the other guests, all rise when he enters and remain standing until he is seated.

All these marks of respect (except kneeling and kissing the ring) should also be shown all clerics and religious by the laity.

Master of Saint Augustine (Netherlandish, ca. 1490). Scenes from the Life of Saint Augustine of Hippo (detail), ca. 1490. Oil, gold, and silver on wood. Made in Bruges, Flanders, South Netherlands. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, The Cloisters Collection, 1961 (61.199) © The Metropolitan Museum of Art.