CMRI Public Masses Canceled for 15 Days

This letter from Rev. Fr. Casimir Puskorius, CMRI, to his parishioners at Mt. St. Michael’s in Spokane, WA, explains it all, so I will not re-invent the wheel. Note: some parts do not apply to Our Lady of Fatima mission because we are small and under normal conditions only have Sunday mass. St. Michael’s is a large parish with a school and convent. I elected to not edit that information out as it is edifying to know and gives a fuller picture of a true Catholic response. Information on livestream masses is included in a post script.
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St. Patrick

March 17, 2020

You’ve heard me say from the pulpit that it’s important to not get hysterical in the present coronavirus crisis, and I continue to repeat that important point. However, we have to be realistic as well, and realize that we might be unwittingly giving or receiving this virus to others.

Today, Bishop Mark Pivarunas sent a message to the CMRI priests stating the following:

As Catholics, we have to set a good example to our neighbor by obeying lawful civil authority. At this time, the President of the United States has issued guidelines for the next 15 days in order to protect the elderly and those with pre-existing conditions from contracting this virus as it could be fatal to them. His other concern is that our healthcare system is not able to provide sufficient medical care to large numbers. It is prudent that we abide by these guidelines not only for the welfare of those most vulnerable, but also that a large number of our faithful avoid mandatory quarantine in the event that even one parishioner should come down with this virus.

Therefore, for the next 15 days, we should cancel all public Masses; however, our churches and chapels should remain open for the faithful to be able to pray privately. Also, our priests should add intheir Masses an “oratio imperata” under #13 Pro Quacumque Tribulatione found in the back of the Missal for the containment of the virus and the health of our parishioners.

You are obviously dispensed from assisting at Mass on Sunday, which is a matter of Church law. You are not dispensed from keeping Sunday holy, however. This obligation is from Divine Law, so you must offer special worship to God in your homes on Sundays, refrain from servile work, and sanctify the day by appropriate observance.

There will be no public Holy Hours, public Stations of the Cross, or other devotions that attract agroup of people larger than 10. The Chapel will be open from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily, and I’m asking the parishioners to sign up for at least one Holy Hour a week – that way we would have continuous adoration of the Blessed Sacrament during the day and evening hours! With over 200 households in the parish, we should be able to easily cover the 105 hours that this represents. The secretary, Anne Marie Netzel, has the sign-up sheet, and you can personally sign up your family or call it in to her. More than one family can be signed up per hour, but be sure to observe the 10-person limit.

The priests will be offering daily Masses, of course, in the Convent, Novitiate, and Rectory, praying for your intentions and asking God to bring this epidemic to an end. They will be available for Confessions at the normally-scheduled times. Besides making the Holy Hours, I urge you to make many Spiritual Communions during this time, since, as rule, the priests will be giving Holy Communion only to those in danger of death. They will continue to make sick calls, taking the necessary health precautions.

It is possible, of course, that this shutdown will last more than the 15 days. We will have to wait and see. I urge you to remember that measures such as this were taken during the great Spanish Flu epidemic in 1918. Those that quarantined and took precautions as a rule survived. “In times like these, it’s good to remember that there have been times like these.”

Obviously, the Mount continues to incur expenses, as you all do. We will gratefully accept your continued tithe and support, which may be given to Anne Marie in the parish office, or to Tim Drahman in the accounting office. We had scheduled the Easter flower collection for next Sunday, March 22, so you may still give your donation for that purpose, if you wish.

The plans for the funeral of Mr. Thomas Drahman are not finalized at this moment. The funeral will not be taking place this week, but when it does, it will be for the family only. This great and devoted parishioner, sadly, will not have the great numbers of attendance that would be desired for one who did so much for our parish and for souls for so many years. After the danger of the corona virus has ceased, we will have a public Rosary and Solemn Requiem Mass to pray for him and honor his memory.

Please watch our website for any updates and changes. And let us pray for one another, our country, and the whole world.

In Jesus and Mary,
Rev. Father Casimir Puskorius, CMRI

P.S. – One more point to share with you from Fr. Benedict Hughes:

“Since the bishop has instructed us to cancel public Masses for the next 15 days, our live-streaming of the Mass is even more valuable and will be beneficial to many souls.

Therefore, we are starting a new schedule for live-streaming the Mass every day, and adding a couple of additional Mass times. So here is our schedule of live-streaming of the Mass for the next couple of weeks:

Daily (Monday through Friday) at 7:00 am Every Saturday at 8:00 am Every Sunday at 7:00 and 9:00 am.

In addition, there will be broadcast High Masses this Thursday, the feast of Saint Joseph, and next Wednesday, the feast of the Annunciation at 10:30 am.

Of course, all times given are for Pacific Daily Time, so you will need to adjust accordingly.

Once again, to connect to the live-stream, people should go to http://www.miqparish.org and click on the live-stream tab on the right, under the word “welcome”. (It is right above the picture of the angels. Then scroll down to the video. This option also allows people to view past Masses, so if a time given is inconvenient for watching the Mass live, they can always view it later.

Also, the Rosary will be prayed at Masses on Saturday and Sunday one-half hour before Mass. In addition, we will be giving Sunday sermons as well, even though the church is empty.

It is my prayer that this service will be a source of grace to our parishioners, as we continue through this trying period.”

In Jesus and Mary,
Fr. M. Benedict, CMRI

Saturday Mass and Work Day; Ash Wednesday

We will have Mass at 8 am on Saturday, Feb. 22, followed by a chapel work day to finish projects and prepare for Holy Week ceremonies. Fr. Sandquist is bringing four seminarians to help. We are so grateful! Our chapel will not have Mass on Ash Wednesday. Fr. Sandquist will be going to Sacred Heart in Topeka that day for Mass at 6 pm.IMG_9850

One-day Schedule Shakeup for Chelsea, Edmond, & Topeka

That headline sounds like it’s referring to train routes! Right? No, no, no. You’re thinking of Judy Garland singing The Atchison, Topeka, and the Santa Fe.
Our headline is about mass schedules for three CMRI mission chapels.
To get to the heart of it, Bp. Pivarunas will be away from Omaha on a Confirmations trip on the weekend of Feb. 15th-16th. So on that Sunday Fr. Sandquist will add the Topeka chapel, Sacred Heart, to his regular mass circuit of Edmond and Chelsea, OK.
To make this possible:
Chelsea will have mass at 7:30 am; 
Edmond will have mass at 11:30 am;
Topeka will have mass at 5:30 pm.
Father will hear confessions 30 minutes before each mass.
To make sure you don’t get confused and can arrive at the station on time, here are the Chelsea Sunday mass times for the rest of February:
Feb. 9th: Mass at 2:00 pm
Feb. 16th: Mass at 7:30 am
Feb. 23rd: Mass at 2:00 pm
All aboard!

Six Seminarians Wow Our Weekend

On Friday night, Fr. Sandquist brought down six first and second-year seminarians from CMRI’s recently-acquired Iowa location to help us prepare for Candlemas and a High Mass for the Feast of the Purification, as well as lend their muscles to a chapel workday: Joe (Nebraska), Dominic (MN), Adam (MI), William (MI), Caleb (Scotland), and Frederic (France).

Saturday morning was dedicated to removing the Christmas decorations and Nativity, followed by server and choir practice. Then sheetrock projects began as the ladies boxed up the large Nativity figures. That complete, the women organized an assembly line to pull nails from salvaged oak baseboards. After the de-nailed boards were stained, seminarians whisked them off to be cut and then nailed in place while others taped so that a second coat could be applied. Fr. Sandquist took to his hands and knees to finish the staining–the baseboards and, he ruefully noted afterward, his hands. Between all the sheetrock dust, the blue tape, and everything being pulled away from the walls, including the altar, it looked like we couldn’t possibly be ready for mass on Sunday, but of course it all came back together with many hands making light work.

Sunday’s Candlemas ceremony and high mass were simply glorious. We couldn’t have asked for a more gorgeous day for our procession either. It was 69 degrees with sunny, blue skies. The seminarians were thrilled with the fantastic weather after enduring a tough winter in Iowa. All the practice paid off, and everything went smoothly. The choir finished with a stunning Stella Matutina. Afterward Adam asked if it was too loud, and I assured him that it was exquisite, and the volume was perfect. Truly, we congregants zoomed heavenward in a musical chariot powered by their strong male voices, sonorous with Marian devotion.

Below is a photo gallery from the Asperges, Candlemas ceremony, and procession:

Below is a photo gallery from the Mass for the Purification, with the final two photos depicting the new location of the statues of Sts. Peter and Paul and a zoomed-in look at the altar with the newly-acquired Jesus and Mary statues.

High Mass and a Procession for Candlemas

A7AA70DE-E256-4E3A-B960-F84805F9BD36This Sunday Fr. Sandquist will do the blessing of the candles ceremony and then, with four seminarians, lead us on a procession. It is our chapel’s very first one, and so it is quite exciting!

Here the Priest recites Five Orations, each ending thus: Per omnia saecula saeculorum. R: Amen. Then the Priest blesses the candles with holy water and incense. During the distribution of the candles, the Choir sings the following Antiphon, which is repeated after each Verse of the Canticle Nunc dimittis:

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During the Procession, Chanters and Choir alternate in singing the Verses of the following Antiphons. If time warrants, the Litany of the Blessed Virgin also may be sung.

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When we return, all giddy, we will have the high mass.

Then the Mass is celebrated. During the Gospel, and from the beginning of the Canon to the Communion, the faithful hold the lighted candles in their hands.