Rogation Monday

litany-of-saintsSome excerpts from Dom Gueranger’s Liturgical Year:

WE need so much penance, and we do so little! If we are truly in earnest, we shall be most fervent in doing the little that is left us to do.

The object of the Rogation days is to appease the anger of God, and avert the chastisements which the sins of the world so justly deserve; moreover, to draw down the divine blessing on the fruits of the earth. The litany of the saints is sung during the procession, which is followed by a special Mass said in the stational church, or if there be no Station appointed, in the church whence the procession first started.

The litany of the saints is one of the most efficacious of prayers. The Church makes use of it on all solemn occasions, as a means of rendering God propitious through the intercession of the whole court of heaven. They who are prevented from assisting at the procession, should recite the litany in union with holy Church: they will thus share in the graces attached to the Rogation days; they will be joining in the supplications now being made throughout the entire world; they will be proving themselves to be Catholics.

Let us pray

O God, whose property it is always to have mercy and to spare: receive our petitions: that we, and all thy servants, who are bound by the chain of sin, may, by the compassion of thy goodness, mercifully be absolved.

Hear, we beseech thee, O Lord, the prayers of thy suppliants, and pardon us our sins, who confess them to thee; that of thy bounty, thou mayst grant us pardon and peace.

Out of thy clemency, O Lord, show us thy unspeakable mercy; that so thou mayst both acquit us of our sins, and deliver us from the punishment we deserve for them. 

O God, who by sin art offended, and by penance pacified, mercifully regard the prayers of thy people, who make supplications to thee; and turn away the scourges of thy anger, which we deserve for our sins.

O almighty and eternal God, have mercy on thy servant N., our chief Bishop, and direct him, according to thy clemency, in the way of everlasting salvation; that, by thy grace, he may desire those things that are agreeable to thee, and perform them with all his strength…

Rogation Days this Week

Rogation Days Q and A
Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday this week are the Rogation Days that precede Ascension Thursday. Historically the Catholic Church has encouraged the faithful to undertake processions on these days, asking God to bless the fields, so that farmers may have good harvests. In modern times we have tended to lose that connection. However, current events are bringing the farmer’s work back to the forefront of our concerns. There are readings and prayers for each day. You may find them and more on the history and explanation of the Rogation Days¬†here.

Six Seminarians Wow Our Weekend

On Friday night, Fr. Sandquist brought down six first and second-year seminarians from CMRI’s recently-acquired Iowa location to help us prepare for Candlemas and a High Mass for the Feast of the Purification, as well as lend their muscles to a chapel workday: Joe (Nebraska), Dominic (MN), Adam (MI), William (MI), Caleb (Scotland), and Frederic (France).

Saturday morning was dedicated to removing the Christmas decorations and Nativity, followed by server and choir practice. Then sheetrock projects began as the ladies boxed up the large Nativity figures. That complete, the women organized an assembly line to pull nails from salvaged oak baseboards. After the de-nailed boards were stained, seminarians whisked them off to be cut and then nailed in place while others taped so that a second coat could be applied. Fr. Sandquist took to his hands and knees to finish the staining–the baseboards and, he ruefully noted afterward, his hands. Between all the sheetrock dust, the blue tape, and everything being pulled away from the walls, including the altar, it looked like we couldn’t possibly be ready for mass on Sunday, but of course it all came back together with many hands making light work.

Sunday’s Candlemas ceremony and high mass were simply glorious. We couldn’t have asked for a more gorgeous day for our procession either. It was 69 degrees with sunny, blue skies. The seminarians were thrilled with the fantastic weather after enduring a tough winter in Iowa. All the practice paid off, and everything went smoothly. The choir finished with a stunning Stella Matutina. Afterward Adam asked if it was too loud, and I assured him that it was exquisite, and the volume was perfect. Truly, we congregants zoomed heavenward in a musical chariot powered by their strong male voices, sonorous with Marian devotion.

Below is a photo gallery from the Asperges, Candlemas ceremony, and procession:

Below is a photo gallery from the Mass for the Purification, with the final two photos depicting the new location of the statues of Sts. Peter and Paul and a zoomed-in look at the altar with the newly-acquired Jesus and Mary statues.

High Mass and a Procession for Candlemas

A7AA70DE-E256-4E3A-B960-F84805F9BD36This Sunday Fr. Sandquist will do the blessing of the candles ceremony and then, with four seminarians, lead us on a procession. It is our chapel’s very first one, and so it is quite exciting!

Here the Priest recites Five Orations, each ending thus: Per omnia saecula saeculorum. R: Amen. Then the Priest blesses the candles with holy water and incense. During the distribution of the candles, the Choir sings the following Antiphon, which is repeated after each Verse of the Canticle Nunc dimittis:

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During the Procession, Chanters and Choir alternate in singing the Verses of the following Antiphons. If time warrants, the Litany of the Blessed Virgin also may be sung.

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When we return, all giddy, we will have the high mass.

Then the Mass is celebrated. During the Gospel, and from the beginning of the Canon to the Communion, the faithful hold the lighted candles in their hands.